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CARISSA MACROCARPA

CARISSA MACROCARPA
Carissa berries are commonly known as ‘Num-num’s’. The humble Num-num bush has glossy dark green leaves and big spiky thorns, protecting its delicate jasmine-like flowers and plump, juicy red berries.
When you pick a Carissa berry, you will find a milky latex at the base of the berry– this milky latex is usually a warning sign in most plants – but in the Carissa berry, it is non-toxic.
The berries are rich in pectin, which makes them great to add to jams, preserves and relishes, binding everything beautifully and glossing it with a ruby-red hue. It is also very high in vitamin C making it a nutritious snack eaten raw. The taste of the berries are tart, sweet, with a cranberry like flavour.
Carssa berry bush sketch

Carissa berry, beetroot and apple relish

Serves 6–8

Ingredients:
¼ cup of Carissa berries, sliced
2 apples cored, peeled and diced
4 small beetroots, peeled and diced
¼ cup of sugar
2 tbs honey
2 tbs apple cider vinegar
3 cloves
1 tbs fennel seeds
1 cinnamon stick
Salt and pepper

Method:
Place all the ingredients in a small pot, except for the honey. Simmer over a low heat until most of the liquid has reduced, for approximately 40 minutes. When it starts to look bubbly and sticky, add the honey and simmer at a low heat for another 5 minutes. Take it off the heat and let it cool down. Pour it over a soft, room-temperature cheese such as Camembert or Brie cheese. Try to share it with your friends – that’s if it even makes it out of your kitchen!

carissa and beetroot relish

How to grow Carissa
Carissa macrocarpa, or ‘Num-num’, is a handsome evergreen shrub with fairly large shiny leaves, and grows to about 2 meters in height. It has thick sharp thorns and can be used to create an effective, impenetrable hedge. Carissa is found naturally in coastal areas from Humansdorp, all the way up to Mozambique. Although able to survive drought and poor soil very well, it grows faster in good soil with some watering. Carissa berry produces beautifully-scented white flowers from spring to mid-summer, and is followed by large red fruits rich in Vitamin C, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. Carissa can be grown easily from seed sown in the spring, but it can also be grown
from semi-hardwood cuttings in spring.

 

Did you know…our recipe book is in the making! Take a sneak peak on the Veld and Sea website HERE

Fynbos Foraging course dates July + August 2016

 

FORAGE HARVEST FEAST

Fynbos Flavours

Introductory half day forage and feasting experience

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR:

Aimed at adults but children are welcome to join their parents. Anyone who has an interest in gardening, in wild food, foraging or indigenous edibles. Chefs wanting to discover new ingredients or foodies wanting to play with the diverse wild flavours in our Indigenous edibles. People interested in Fynbos, in vegetable gardening, self sufficiency, in the Slow Food movement or those that just want to have a unique and delicious experience at a beautiful venue with like minded people.
WHAT TO EXPECT:
Each course is different according to the season and availability in the gardens and the bush. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Forage for indigenous edibles, learn how to sustainably harvest them, utilize them in your kitchen, grow them in your garden and some of their medicinal properties. Learn about wild herbs and how to preserve and prepare them. After snacks and a gathering tour we will get creative in the foraging classroom kitchen and prepare and share a feast.

WHAT IS INCLUDED:
This half day course includes wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious three course lunch based on ingredients foraged, harvested and prepared by the group. You will also receive information sheets and recipes on the plants that we will use in the meal PLUS two indigenous edible pot plants to take home.

WHAT TO BRING:
Gumboots or comfortable walking shoes, raincoat/sun hat – suitable outdoor gear. Cameras are welcome. Don’t forget an open mind and your sense of humour!

BONUS:

You can also enjoy a 10% discount in the nursery retail should you wish to purchase any indigenous plants for your garden.

PRICE:
R550 p/person or R2000 for group of four. Children under 17yrs R200, Children under 2yrs free. Full payment will secure your booking as spaces are limited.

DURATION:
10am – 2pm

DATES:

23rd of July

30th July

13th August 

27th August

VENUE:

Good Hope Gardens Nursery, Plateau Rd (M65),Cape Point

GUIDES:

Roushanna and Gael Gray

IS THIS SUITABLE FOR VEGETARIANS:

Yes – all the dishes on this course are vegetarian, and all food intolerances are catered for, please let us know in advance.

MAX NUMBER OF PEOPLE PER COURSE:

16

AVAILABLE FOR A PRIVATE FUNCTION:

Yes – Min number of people required: 10.
TO BOOK:
email roushanna@hotmail.com

Veld and Sea Flavour Challange

Calling all chefs, mixologists, cooks and foodies!

In a bid to create awareness and interest in all the delicious wild flavours our indigenous edible plants have to offer, we are launching a Veld and Sea Flavour Challenge this summer.

How does it work?

Every two weeks I will be putting together a mix of indigenous edibles for participating restaurants, bars and foodies, labeled with their common and Latin names and share a brief rundown of their culinary uses. No payment is required, just a trade exchange for the photos of the food or drink they create with the plants, so we can share them on our social media platforms, giving credit to the creators and establishments and inspiring others to join in this deliciously wild challenge.

How do I get involved?

Easy – email roushanna@hotmail.com with #veldandseaflavourchallenge in the heading and let me know who you are, what you do and where you are based.

What if I have my own indigenous edibles?

Epic! And even easier – just post your food photos on Instagram, tag it with #veldandseaflavourchallenge with a description of the botanicals you used plus what your dish is called and we will include your story in this incredible edible wild flavour food journey.

Indigenous edible plants with Veld and Sea

Fynbos Foraging dates – August and September 2015

Forage Harvest Feast

Thank you for reading this post – please note, all our forages are now fully booked. To join our mailing list to be notified on any upcoming forages and events, please email roushanna@hotmail.com with PLEASE ADD ME TO MAILING LIST in the heading.

Fynbos foraging Cape Point

Introductory half day forage and feasting experience

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR:

Aimed at adults but children are welcome to join their parents. Anyone who has an interest in gardening, in wild food, foraging or indigenous edibles. Chefs wanting to discover new ingredients or foodies wanting to play with the diverse wild flavours in our Indigenous edibles. People interested in Fynbos, in vegetable gardening, self sufficiency, in the Slow Food movement or those that just want to have a unique and delicious experience at a beautiful venue with like minded people.
WHAT TO EXPECT:
Each course is different according to the season and availability in the gardens and the bush. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Forage for indigenous edibles, learn how to sustainably harvest them, utilize them in your kitchen, grow them in your garden and some of their medicinal properties. Learn about wild herbs and how to preserve and prepare them. After snacks and a gathering tour we will get creative in the foraging classroom kitchen and prepare and share a feast.

WHAT IS INCLUDED:
This half day course includes wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious three course lunch based on ingredients foraged, harvested and prepared by the group. You will also receive information sheets and recipes on the plants that we will use in the meal.

WHAT TO BRING:
Gumboots or comfortable walking shoes, raincoat/sun hat – suitable outdoor gear. Cameras are welcome. Don’t forget an open mind and your sense of humour!

BONUS:

You can also enjoy a 10% discount in the nursery retail should you wish to purchase any indigenous plants for your garden.

PRICE:
R500 p/person or R1800 for group of four. Children under 17yrs R200, Children under 2yrs free. Full payment will secure your booking as spaces are limited.

DURATION:
10am – 2pm

DATES:

15th August   – FULLY BOOKED

26th August   – FULLY BOOKED

12th September – FULLY BOOKED

26th September – FULLY BOOKED

VENUE:

Good Hope Gardens Nursery, Plateau Rd (M65),Cape Point

GUIDES:

Roushanna and Gael Gray

IS THIS SUITABLE FOR VEGETARIANS:

Yes – all the dishes on this course are vegetarian, and all food intolerances are catered for, please let us know in advance.

MAX NUMBER OF PEOPLE PER COURSE:

16

AVAILABLE FOR A PRIVATE FUNCTION:

Yes – Min number of people required: 10.
TO BOOK:
email roushanna@hotmail.com

Fynbos Foraging Course

Foraging for flavour

On our last Fynbos Forage – Forage Harvest Feast – we welcomed the winner of our last Facebook competition, Nic Leighton and his partner Gabby Holmes.

Luckily for us, it turned out that they are both highly talented photographers and arrived for the forage armed with cameras and a passion for foraging and food – a great combination!

A huge Thank You to Gabby was kind enough to share some of the beautiful shots she took on the day, capturing each moment so that you can almost smell the fragrance through her photos.

 Wildfood snacks

Sheeps milk cheese

Edible flower cheeses

Forage Harvest Feast

Foraging course Cape Town

Rooibosand Pepermint Pelargonium cupcakes

Rooibos cupcakes

For those wanting to join us on one of these courses, we only have four left for the season with the first two upcoming forages already fully booked – so hurry and save yourself a spot soon by emailing roushanna@hotmail.com

We would love to have you join us in our Foraging and Feasting!

Forage Harvest Feast – July 2015

On a windless, sunny, Cape winters day last Saturday, we held our first Fynbos Foraging course of the season – Forage Harvest Feast.

We looked at some very important foraging rules, sustainability of foraging, different ways of using Fynbos for flavour, indigenous edibles for culinary use and we touched on some of the medicinal properties of these amazingly useful plants.

We foraged and harvested wild and cultivated ingredients, tasting and smelling our way through the gardens and meandering wild paths in and around the Good Hope Gardens Nursery and then together we prepped and prepared a lunch feast with a few wild botanical cocktails made with The Botanist Gin to get things going.

A huge thank you to everyone who attended – what an awesome group! Every single person was so interested and involved, what a pleasure to share plant knowledge, the whole foraging experience and enjoy such a delicious meal with you all. A special mention of thanks goes out to the very talented Sitaara Stodel who was there to capture our day on camera and to Janet Lightbody for our beautiful Janet Ceramic heart dishes and ramekins.

Take a look at what we got up to:

Foraging courses Cape Town

Fynbos Foraging at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Wild food foraging Cape Town

Fynbos foraging Cape Point

Forage Harvest Feast

Foraging courses Cape Town

Forage Harvest Feast at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Foraging classroom Cape Point

Forage Harvest Feast Fynbos foraging courses

Wild greens pesto at Good Hope Gardens Nursery foraging course

Wild botanical cocktails

Forage Harvest Feast Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Foraging course Cape TownCheers!

If you would like to join us on one of our upcoming forages, please click HERE for more details or email roushanna@hotmail.com to book.

Fynbos Foraging Course Dates

Fynbos Foraging Course – Forage Harvest Feast

Forage Harvest Feast at Good Hope Gardens Nursery

Introductory half day forage and feasting experience

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR:

Aimed at adults but children are welcome to join their parents. Anyone who has an interest in gardening, in wild food, foraging or indigenous edibles. Chefs wanting to discover new ingredients or foodies wanting to play with the diverse wild flavours in our Indigenous edibles. People interested in Fynbos, in vegetable gardening, self sufficiency, in the Slow Food movement or those that just want to have a unique and delicious experience at a beautiful venue with like minded people.
WHAT TO EXPECT:
Each course is different according to the season and availability in the gardens and the bush. Explore the gardens, discover and pick edible floral foods and fresh organic vegetables. Forage for indigenous edibles, learn how to sustainably harvest them, utilize them in your kitchen, grow them in your garden and some of their medicinal properties. Learn about wild herbs and how to preserve and prepare them. After snacks and a gathering tour we will get creative in the foraging classroom kitchen and prepare and share a feast.

WHAT IS INCLUDED:
This half day course includes wild food snacks and drinks, a delicious three course lunch based on ingredients foraged, harvested and prepared by the group. You will also receive information sheets and recipes on the plants that we will use in the meal.

WHAT TO BRING:
Gumboots or comfortable walking shoes, raincoat/sun hat – suitable outdoor gear. Cameras are welcome. Don’t forget an open mind and your sense of humour!

BONUS:

You can also enjoy a 10% discount in the nursery retail should you wish to purchase any indigenous plants for your garden.

PRICE:
R500 p/person or R1800 for group of four. Children under 17yrs R200, Children under 2yrs free. Full payment will secure your booking as spaces are limited.

DURATION:
10am – 2pm

DATES:

June 27thJuly 25th, August 15thAugust 29th

VENUE:

Good Hope Gardens Nursery, Plateau Rd (M65),Cape Point

GUIDES:

Roushanna and Gael Gray

IS THIS SUITABLE FOR VEGETARIANS:

Yes – all the dishes on this course are vegetarian, and all food intolerances are catered for, please let us know in advance.

MAX NUMBER OF PEOPLE PER COURSE:

16

AVAILABLE FOR A PRIVATE FUNCTION:

Yes – Min number of people required: 10.
TO BOOK:
email roushanna@hotmail.com

Fynbos Foraging Course

Grewia occidentalis recipe

Grewia occidentalis is commonly known as kruisbessie or cross-berry tree. It is a fast growing small tree or large shrub, hardy, has fibrous roots and grows in a variety of soil conditions. It can be planted in full sun or shade, and makes a great wind break. Once mature, it likes to be pruned. They can grow up to 5 meters, wind dependent.

Grewia occidentalis

It has very strong wood that does not splinter and was used traditionally by the bushmen to make bows and by the Xhosa and Zulu to make bows and handles for axes and assegaai’s. It also has a host of magical and medicinal properties including using the bark as a shampoo to combat grey hair and making a tea out of the leaves and twigs to ease childbirth or for impotency and bareness.

It attracts butterflies, is loved by birds for its tasty berries and carpenter bees often find a home in its wood and relish the pollen from pretty ten petaled mauve star-shaped flowers. Livestock enjoy the bark and leaves.Grewia occidentalis flower

It forms a four lobed fruit, green at first and then ripening to a golden reddish brown waxy fruit. These fruits are sweet and chewy with a tough skin and a big pip. They were used by bushmen as snacks particularly for long journeys as they kept well as dried fruit. Other culinary uses include flavouring porridge, the fruit crushed for juice and either taken fresh or fermented for beer, boiled with milk or used in a goats milk yoghurt.

Grewia occidentalis berries

We have a big Grewia tree outside our house, filled with life – at the moment the berries are just beginning to ripen, and the garden is filled with the sounds of the birds and bees, butterflies and insects busy in the branches, flitting from flower to flower. I too, was in the tree. Dangling precariously from the treehouse planks, tiptoeing on the little branches, looking for some ripe fruit for my recipe. Crazed by the idea in my head, I even forgot about my fear of heights. Not dangerous at all. Especially when we spotted a massive snake in the tree a few hours later.

Hot crossberry drink.

Hot Crossberry drink - Grewia occidentalis

Ingredients:

1 handful of ripe Grewia o. berries

1 cup of milk ( I used goats milk)

A few half opened Grewia o. flowers.

Method:

Put the berries and milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 mins. Pour through a strainer and sieve, squashing all the flavoured milk through with the back of a spoon. Pour into a cup, serve warm. Pop a few semi opened flowers on top of the drink and watch as they open up completely with the heat of the drink. Smile as everyone claps.

This drink is deliciously malty and sweet with a hint of fruit, creamy in texture and a dreamy caramel colour.

Result!

Cheers to Indigenous food revival.

Grewia occidentalis

Grewia occidentalis berries

*references:

plantzafrica.com 

Indigenous Healing Plants – Margaret Roberts

Food from the Veld – F.W.Fox and M. E. Norwood Young

Tom Gray from Good Hope Gardens Landscaping

Wild Food on the West Coast

With dreams of long, sweet, left-handed rides down the point, we headed up the West Coast one weekend with a bakkie full of surfboards and a sparkle in our eyes.

But fate was not on our side and there was no swell to be found in Elands Bay. On our walks to the beach for the ever-hopeful surf report, we spotted many wild edibles growing along the road.

Mesembryanthemum crystallinumIce Plant – Mesembryanthemum crystallinum

Trachyandra falcataVeldkool – Trachyandra falcata

Tetragonia decumbensDune spinach – Tetragonia decumbens

Inspired by the local wild food, we were delighted to secure a Sunday lunch booking at Oep ve Koep.

On our way to Paternoster, millions of bright yellow Oxalis flowers greeted us from both sides of the road as far as the eye could see.

Oxalis pes capraeSuring – Oxalis pes-caprae

Hungry, late and apologetic – we entered Die Winkel op Paternoster. For people who love farm products and wild food, we Had Arrived. We were served with the most amazing meal – the freshness, the detail, the involuntary roll of our eyes with each mouthful.

Wow.

Thank you Kobus van der Merwe – you are a wild food gastronomy alchemist.

Menu at Oep ve KoepUm….one of everything please.

OystersOysters with apple, wild sage flowers, wild fennel, ice plant and sea lettuce.

Chenopodium chapatisImifino chapatis with pickled veldkool and yoghurt.

Shoreline soupShoreline soup.

White fish pickle, Ice plant, citrus and fennel .Ice plant, white fish pickle, fennel and citrus.

Farm breadFarm bread and fresh herbs.

Farm butter, fish pate and orange preserve

Farm butter, fish pate and preserved orange.

DSCF6700

 Springbok, limpets, heerenboon, winter greens.

carrot bobotie

Carrot bobotie, pomegranate pilaf, peach mebos.

Come on, really now. Isn’t that just the best thing you have ever seen?

Seduced by the charm of the sleepy fishing village, we decided to stay the night and explore a bit. We went to the beach, for lots of walks and of course, to the Cape Columbine Nature Reserve.

Paternoster beach

Paternoster beach

Dimorphotheca pluvialis

Dimorphotheca pluvialis in white blossom.

Cape Columbine lighthouse

The Cape Columbine lighthouse.

And all around us…winter greens. A veritable landscape of food.

Wild asparagus

Wild asparagus

Veldkool

Veldkool.

Chrysanthemoides incana

Chrysanthemoides incana.

Malva

Pretty Mallow.

Wild sage

Wild sage.

What beautiful and tasty biodiversity we have in our country. Hand in hand with sustainable harvesting, food security has a fragrant light at the end of South Africas wild food tunnel.

Rise up Indigenous food revival – you are delicious!

Forage Harvest Feast

A few weeks ago we had our first Forage Harvest Feast of the season.

It was cold, wet and delicious.

We had a very interesting crowd, including the talented Kate Higgs, who joined us with her magic photography skills.

Here is a little bit of what we got up to…

Peppermint PelargoniumPelargonium tomentosum

Foraging toolsTools

Urban hunter gathererThe Urban Hunter Gatherer digging up some wild garlic – Tulbaghia violacea.

Medicinal Indigeous plantsDescribing medicinal uses for sour fig – Carpobrotus edulis.

VeldkoolVeldkool season – Trachyandra.

Forage Harvest Feast

A sensory experience.

City of EdenAnna Shevel of The City of Eden with her basket of goods.

Wild foodGood Hope honey and raw wild berry jam

Organic vegOrganic veg.

Foaging course Cape TownWashing and chatting.

Foraged ingredientsA foraged herb basket.

Table Bay Hotel chefsChefs from the Table Bay Hotel having fun and chopping up a storm

Wild greens pestoThe Pesto Queen

Forage Harvest FeastFrom bush to table…

Centre for Optimal HealthFeast!

Pelargonium and HoneybushcupcakesPelargonium and Honeybush cupcakes.

Fynbos Foraging courseIf you would like to join us for a Forage Harvest Feast, here are the upcoming course dates:

Saturday the 16th of August, 10am – 2pm FULLY BOOKED

Saturday the 30th of August, 10am – 2pm

Saturday the 4th of October, 10am – 2pm

To book or for more info email roushanna@hotmail.com